PAINKILLER LAW: Yet More Evidence That the Drug is the Problem

Yet more evidence has emerged that long-acting extended release opioids for chronic pain should never have been marketed as safe, effective and generally non-addictive. To avoid criminal liability, malpractice suits or Medical Board actions, medical providers who prescribe opioids for their patients have to change with the changing science. To ignore the changing science – major developments emerge pretty much weekly now – is to risk imperiling patients with outdated information, and to consequently put your liberty and livelihood in great danger. If you’re out of the loop on information that could save your patients’ lives, when you had the chance to come up to speed and you ignored or passed on the opportunity, imagine how easy you’ll have made it for the DEA, or your licensing board, to nab you. I’ve said this before, and I say it again because there’s more important news to share about this.

Here’s what we know so far:

-The Centers for Disease Control believe that too many doctors are prescribing too many opioids to too many patients;

-The AMA concurs, to the great disappointment of pharmaceutical manufacturers;

-The FDA has ordered new labeling for long-acting extended release opioids to better warn providers and patients of the dangers of addiction and abuse;

-Johns Hopkins Medical School has concluded that even though opioid prescriptions have skyrocketed, fewer patients are actually experiencing pain relief.

And now, Exhibit 5: The National Pain Report on September 23, 2013 says that “a drug increasingly being used to treat opioid addiction may be fueling a new epidemic of diversion, overdose, addiction and death in the U.S.” The article talks about buprenorphine, known by its brand name, Suboxone, and how it is not only being prescribed by some doctors who don’t know what they’re doing, but that it’s also being sold on the street by heroin dealers because it reportedly softens any withdrawal symptoms between doses or highs.

And still, pharmaceutical manufacturers would have patients and physicians believe that the problem is not with the drugs themselves. Instead we see the same old acronyms like “the 5 R’s, or “S.A.F.E. N.A.R.C.” or other catchy phrases that do what they can, but which ultimately miss the point, in favor of the idea that the patient and the doctor can be in complete control in any prescribing or treatment scenario. Patients and doctors can’t be, because the drugs are too powerful. The nation’s prescription drug abuse epidemic and the weekly scientific bombshells prove this.

So what to do, if you are a medical provider? First, if you’re not in pain management, don’t get into it unless you are Board certified and fully trained by a body other than a self-interested, profit-motivated provider advocacy group. Such groups will sell you on taking the easy way, and that will ultimately disserve your patients and you. Second, if you already have a pain management practice, read and incorporate all the new scientific data into your practice without delay, so that you can show any law enforcement investigators that when the science changed, you changed with it. And third, even though the current assessment, treatment, monitoring and other compliance/patient safety tools are valid and should continue to be utilized, know that they’re increasingly being revealed as inadequate. They are no match for the immense power of the drugs they seek to keep in check. So relying on them alone will, as the science continues to advance, leave you high and dry when it comes to defending yourself against criminal, malpractice, or Medical Board scrutiny.

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PURDUE PHARMA’S SUPER SECRET LIST OF RISKY PRESCRIBERS: YOU CAN’T SEE IT.

This past Sunday’s Los Angeles Times tells that Purdue Pharmaceuticals, manufacturer of Oxycontin, has for about a decade maintained a lengthy list of Oxy prescribers who in Purdue’s view potentially overprescribe or otherwise put patients at risk. Purdue won’t disclose the list, though, and doesn’t reveal the criteria for how it decides whether to share an occasional name with a medical board or the DEA. This is extremely troubling, and Purdue’s position raises several major legal and policy concerns:

1. Purdue’s being stingy about revealing names or the criteria for revealing names to law enforcement leaves the company’s motives suspect and prevents relevant government agencies from being alerted to possible overprescribing or patient risk.

2. The list has been maintained since 2002; Oxy has been on the market since 1996. The very existence of the list suggests that Purdue knows the addiction potential of the drug it for years has marketed as safe and generally non-addictive. Wouldn’t an overriding interest in competent medical practice, safe prescribing and patient safety compel the sharing of information between the manufacturer, doctors and regulators?

3. The company’s own partial list of “red flags” for signs of overprescribing or shady Rx practices — long patient lines, people nodding off in the waiting room (in the manner of heroin addicts’ being “on the nod”), cash transactions, and lots of young patients supposedly in excruciating and ceaseless pain — includes the same signs law enforcement looks for, too. Why not share this information?

4. If a doctor is on the list, and is prosecuted for prescribing-related criminal offenses, is the list now supposed to be relevant evidence of guilt?

5. If a doctor is not on the list, and is prosecuted for prescribing-related criminal offenses, is the absence of that doc’s name on the list now exculpatory evidence of innocence?

My guess is that the exposure of the list’s existence will prompt (a) prosecutors and investigators to start issuing subpoenas for the list; (b) defense attorneys like me to subpoena the list or otherwise make the list’s existence an issue in a medical provider’s defense; (c) legislation at the state or federal level, or the threat of legislation, to compel Purdue to share information with appropriate authorities; (d) Purdue’s worrying about civil liability for previously not disclosing the list.

I expect we’ll be hearing more about this issue in the future. In the meantime, medical providers and their insurers and malpractice defense lawyers should know what the signs of risky prescribing are, and know how to ameliorate patient risk and maximize the practice and the appearance of practice of competent, informed medicine.

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PAINKILLER LAW: When Crime’s All You Look For, You See Too Many Criminals

If you wake up every morning, strap on a badge and gun and go fight the War on Drugs, you come to view the world in a certain way. If your goal for each workday is to go in peace and not come back in pieces, your perspective on society, people, crime and your role in combating evil are invariably shaped by your experience. That’s why it’s a mistake for the DEA to bring its ordinary approach against drug crime to the issue of prescription drug abuse. But that is just what the agency is doing. It is basically treating like a criminal any healthcare professional who shows up on its radar.

At the recent joint conference sponsored by the California Medical Board and Board of Pharmacy, I heard the DEA speak about rampant drug diversion, pharmacists’ widespread complicity in prescription drug abuse, doctors wantonly prescribing outside the standard of care, drug dealers in white coats, and the DEA’s determination to crack down. The problem is, no one can quantify the degree of “complicity” by the nation’s pharmacists, or durably judge when a provider is prescribing outside the standard of care. The DEA says it’s happening, and its agents are the ones with the guns, and so, well, it must be happening.

The sense of things that I had coming into the conference was unfortunately not at all changed by what I heard there. The DEA’s talk was dominated by war stories of pharmaceutical distributors selling Oxy out the back door, of pharmacists ordering more than they need and keeping lousy records of where it all went, of doctors making megabucks writing scrips for no reason, and patients visiting websites devoted to the celebration of hallucinogens. Seriously, that’s what the speaker talked about. That’s clearly not the entire scope of the issue, and those characterizations don’t fairly define all medical providers or pharmacists or patients. None the less, the DEA is bringing its habitual mindset to a new class of cases and investigations – and a new “target” population – and that’s the wrong approach.

Clearly, the DEA is in reaction mode, just as Medical Boards nationwide are, and it’s being blamed for missing the early signs of what became a prescription drug abuse crisis. In reaction to the blame, the DEA is redirecting the pressure onto doctors, pharmacists and others who the DEA thinks are responsible for whatever the agency is supposed to be trying to stop. And what exactly is to be stopped? Who should decide whether a patient needs the drugs he or she is given: The prescriber, or the federal agent? If a doctor prescribes a lot of pills to a lot of patients, does it mean he or she is operating a pill mill? If a pharmacist fills prescriptions, is the pharmacist automatically part of the problem? And if the meaning of “outside the standard of care” can’t even be succinctly articulated in the law, how are law enforcement agents to know where the line is, BEFORE they decide a practitioner or pharmacist is dirty?

These are the questions all of us must vigilantly continue asking, persistently and if need be peskily, in this latest iteration of the War on Drugs. There is no easy answer, no matter what the DEA might think.

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VOICE OF REASON VS. CALL TO ARMS: THE CALIF. MEDICAL/PHARMACY BOARDS’ CONFERENCE ON PRESCRIPTION DRUG ABUSE

Recently I attended a conference sponsored by the California Medical Board and Board of Pharmacy. I think I was the only criminal defense lawyer in the room. The two-day event was entitled, “Joint Forum to Promote Appropriate Prescribing and Dispensing,” and was supposed to help healthcare providers and pharmacists know the law of controlled substance prescriptions, so they could follow the law and care for patients better. But that didn’t happen. Instead, during a Q and A with high-ranking Board officials on a panel, one attendee put it perfectly: The Boards are in “punitive” mode, “waiting to pounce” on prescribers and providers. That really was the unmistakable and highly regrettable message of the conference. In this post and several to follow, I’ll explain.

The voice of reason was heard briefly in the conference’s opening session. It belonged to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, better known as the Drug Czar. The speaker from the Office listed ways to screen for potential abuse, advice for effective patient monitoring, relevant CME, and other tools doctors could use in caring for patients while helping to curb abuse.

The speaker’s final suggestion was the most interesting, to me: He advised providers to regularly prescribe naloxone, the “anti-overdose” drug that has helped save the lives of accidental opiate overdose patients around the country. Great idea! But there’s also a downside, which I pointed out to the speaker: In today’s aggressive enforcement environment, the DEA and Medical Board might view writing for naloxone as prima facie evidence of excessive opioid prescribing. After all, if a doctor felt a patient was at risk of overdosing, why did the doctor write the opioid scrip at all? And why did a pharmacist fill it? What I fear, and what the official acknowledged could be a real issue, is that a provider’s or pharmacist’s act of patient protection could be used against them in a federal or state criminal investigation. That, to put it technically, would be totally uncool. And unfair. And inadvisable as policy and practice.

When the Drug Czar’s office had concluded its remarks, the DEA assumed the microphone. With that transition, the voice of reason gave way to a one-sided call to arms against the very professions represented by the conference’s attendees. More on this in the next post.

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PAINKILLER LAW: FDA and I Call For Abuse-Deterrent Drug Agents

The FDA today called upon pharmaceutical researchers to develop formulations of opioids that would bring pain relief while reducing the possibility of addiction. The FDA refers to “abuse-deterrent” drug agents in the chemical sense. I join the FDA in calling for abuse-deterrent drug agents, only the kind of agents I’m talking about wear badges, drive fast in unmarked cars, and show up heavily armed.

The FDA should be commended for its balanced approach, in which it seeks both the development of less addictive drugs, and the need to get real pain relief to patients. What concerns me is that in investigating healthcare providers who write Schedule II-V prescriptions, typically law enforcement agents including the DEA and state Medical Boards emphasize “case clearing” over balance, hard and fast over nuance, and black and white over shades of gray. Whereas the FDA’s January 9 statement expresses its extreme concern “about the inappropriate use of prescription opioids,” the FDA doesn’t define “inappropriate.” Left to the determination of the DEA, which has been accused of being late to the party on addressing prescription drug abuse, and left to state Medical Boards, which have been accused of bailing on the party altogether, the definition of “inappropriate” could be bent, twisted, contorted, and most dangerously, broadened to encompass practices and procedures which a better informed or more detached observer would never contemplate. But when the warrant is signed or the cuffs slapped on, it’s too late for a healthcare provider to say, “Let’s slow down, back up, look at this from the beginning, and then discuss.”

That is why every healthcare provider, risk manager, medical group manager and professional needs to know the black-letter federal and state law of Schedule II-V prescriptions, and the nuances and subtleties of how the law is interpreted, what influences and impacts the agencies charged with “cracking down” on supposedly corrupt providers, and what you can do now, today, to ensure patient safety and the protection of your practice. This is why PAINKILLER LAW exists. Don’t let yourself fall victim to the subjective and loosey-goosey way law enforcement agencies and Medical Boards are defining “inappropriate,” “overprescribing,” “gross negligence,” or other concepts whose interpretation could be fraught with peril for even the most honest and ethical MD, osteopath, or physician’s assistant. Let us help you verify, achieve and maintain full compliance with the laws that well-intentioned but hopelessly biased drug agents are ever more aggressively attempting to enforce.

PAINKILLER LAW – It’s good preventative medicine.

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PAINKILLER LAW: SEIZING OPPORTUNITY, CALIFORNIA LAWMAKER BOLDLY JUMPS ON BANDWAGON

This past Sunday, the LA Times ran a searing and exhaustively researched article on prescription drug abuse, called “Dying for Relief.” This past Monday, as is the fashion among legislators nationwide, a California lawmaker loudly reacted to the article and grabbed a headline of his own.

Ordinarily, a legislator’s jumping on the bandwagon after a big article runs in the paper isn’t news. But here it is, because in response to the national public health problem of prescription drug abuse, California State Senator Curren Price, Jr. is introducing legislation that targets healthcare providers for law enforcement action. A law enforcement approach to a public health problem typically scores political points and funds new multiagency task forces, while doing nothing to actually address the problem. And innocent people – here, legitimate healthcare providers writing legal prescriptions for approved drugs – get steamrolled in the name of public safety.

Price’s idea isn’t so outrageous: He wants coroner’s offices in California to automatically report patient deaths to the California Medical Board whenever a coroner concludes that prescription drugs caused or contributed to someone’s death.

But the devil will be in the details, because the Medical Board is under tremendous pressure to “crack down” or “do something” about Rx abuse and suspected corrupt healthcare providers. All this while California law doesn’t even define “overprescribing,” for example.

PAINKILLER LAW will be watching very closely for the language and implications of the Price bill. I’m concerned that whereas a coroner’s findings may be circumspect and sober, the Medical Board will eagerly grab the autopsy report and form a posse to go after the “bad guy.” Senator Price needs to be alert to the pressure the Board will put on him and his committee to give the Board too much latitude in investigating, accusing or proceeding against healthcare providers who’ve written prescriptions for potentially addictive drugs. The offense itself is not clearly defined, yet law enforcement will want broad discretion to target it. That’s putting the cart before the horse.

Contact PAINKILLER LAW: CRIMINAL LAW COMPLIANCE FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS, for a free consultation. We want to help you verify, achieve and maintain compliance with the criminal laws of prescribing for Schedule II through V drugs.

213.293.3737 info@painkillerlaw.com Meister Law Offices

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PAINKILLER LAW: ARE ABUSE STATS THE NEXT “YELLOW CAKE” SPEECH?

The National Center on Drug Abuse, affiliated with the U.S. Government’s National Institutes of Health, compiled and put out a statistic awhile ago that 5.1 million Americans had taken prescription painkillers in the past month for “nonmedical reasons.” The statistic, released in 2010, is still being turned to today by the USG and others as calls to action against healthcare providers who prescribe Schedule II through V pain medication. The government’s argument then and now is fundamentally flawed, and unless it’s confronted, it threatens to become the government’s next “Yellow Cake” speech and recklessly target and penalize innocent and ethical healthcare professionals. The Yellow Cake speech, delivered to the United Nations by former Gen. Colin Powell during the George W. Bush administration, was the 16-word pronouncement that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction as a result of obtaining nuclear material, or “yellow cake,” from an African nation. The intel, of course, turned out to be wrong, and Gen. Powell has repeatedly said that delivering that speech is the biggest regret of his entire career.

First, the Center’s statistic itself is dubious. Who are these 5.1 million Americans? Patients? People with current, valid prescriptions? People whose dose has been monitored by their doctors? How do those surveyed draw the line between “medical use” and “nonmedical use,” and was there a static definition of “nonmedical” utilized as a standard measure from person to person? Or was “nonmedical use” a completely subjective notion, varying widely from person to person surveyed? The statistic is a compelling read, but its foundation, upon the most rudimentary examination, is shaky.

Second, the statistic says nothing about whether the source of the “nonmedical” painkillers is the user’s healthcare provider. Were these lawfully prescribed pills? Black market resells? Internet Oxy? There is no connection made between user and healthcare provider.

Third, and most importantly, the government mistakenly draws this connection in its current pronouncements about the need to “crack down” or “do something” about prescription drug abuse. The Office of National Drug Control Policy, the DEA, states’ Medical Boards and other powerful agencies are looking for someone to blame, and they’re focusing “like lasers,” to borrow from former president Clinton, on doctors, osteopaths, physician’s assistants, and pharmacists. No doubt there are some corrupt providers, pill mills do exist, drug diversion onto the black market is real, and a lot of people are addicted to prescription painkillers. But government at all levels nationwide is taking a hamfisted, impulsive, under-informed and careless approach to complaints, investigations, license revocation proceedings, lawsuits and criminal prosecutions. And with the pressure coming from legislators, patient advocates and vocal critics of prescription painkillers, the ethical healthcare provider should expect to come under investigative scrutiny even if in a different enforcement environment no official attention would be warranted.

Amid the swirling turbine of subpoenas, search warrants, legislation that second-guesses or replaces medical judgment, and other risks, healthcare providers must ensure that they are in full compliance with all criminal laws affecting and regulating prescription painkillers.

The Meister Law Offices has pioneered a critical new area of criminal defense – PAINKILLER LAW: CRIMINAL LAW COMPLIANCE FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS. We are here to help. We help you verify, achieve and maintain compliance, so you can practice knowing you’re doing right by your patients and the law, and so if the law comes knocking anyway, you’re ready and able to stand up for yourself.

Call us today at 213.293.3737 for a free consultation, or write to us at info@painkillerlaw.com.

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PAINKILLER LAW: Red Ribbon Week Is About Prevention, Not Prosecution

This week has been Red Ribbon Week, the nationally observed period devoted to substance abuse prevention, and originally dedicated to the memory of slain U.S. DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena, who was murdered by a Mexican drug cartel in 1985. During Red Ribbon Week, kids and adults across the country wear a red ribbon to make a public statement about staying away from drugs, and to honor U.S. law enforcement agents who have been killed in the line of duty. But this week’s message from the White House Drug Czar should send shivers down the spine of any healthcare provider writing for prescription painkillers. Here’s why:

If you are a healthcare provider writing prescriptions for Schedule II through I painkillers, you normally needn’t think that the memory of Kiki Camarena would impact how law enforcement views you. After all, Camarena, a tough and experienced D.E.A. agent stationed in Guadalajara in the 1980′s and investigating a vast drug trafficking conspiracy reaching into the Mexican government and Army, was going after serious criminals – not your neighborhood internist or local urgent care provider. Kiki’s targets were cocaine, heroin, and big shipments of marijuana – not legitimate prescriptions written lawfully by licensed professionals. His cover was betrayed, he was kidnapped, brutally tortured, and murdered by vicious criminals, some of whom later stood trial in the United States. None of this should have anything to do with the average healthcare practitioner’s life, beyond respectfully remembering Camarena’s bravery, courage and sacrifice.

But in today’s hyper-aggressive investigative environment, with the Feds waxing on about “dope dealers with a medical license,” the line between legitimate providers and illicit traffickers is purposely being muddled by law enforcement in the name of “going after” prescription drug abuse. Look no further than the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy this past week, when its director took to YouTube and urged people observing Red Ribbon Week to bear in mind the new scourges of “teenage alcohol abuse, and prescription drug abuse.” His good faith statement about drug abuse prevention is quickly belied by the bellicose and over-the-top language used by the law enforcement agencies now under pressure to “crack down” by investigating, prosecuting or initiating administrative/licensing proceedings against healthcare providers. In an atmosphere of hysteria, which will only get worse, healthcare providers must protect themselves from government abuse undertaken in the name of stopping drug abuse.

PAINKILLER LAW: CRIMINAL LAW COMPLIANCE FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS, is here to help. PAINKILLER LAW is a comprehensive service of the Meister Law Offices, and is the industry pioneer and leader in criminal law compliance for providers writing painkiller prescriptions. Don’t be lulled into thinking you will never face DEA or Medical Board scrutiny for your prescription writing. And don’t bury your head in the sand hoping nothing will happen the next time a patient makes a bogus complaint about something you did relating to a pain prescription. Call us today at 213.293.3737, or write us at info@painkillerlaw.com for a free consultation. It’s good preventative medicine.

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PAINKILLER LAW: The Healthcare Provider’s Dilemma

Prescription for Addiction,” which ran in the Wall Street Journal this past weekend, is one of the most thorough, best researched and best written articles to date on the national issue of prescription painkiller abuse.  I urge you to read the article carefully.  Among its many astute observations, the article encapsulated what I call “The Healthcare Provider’s Dilemma,” when it wrote (in summary) that providers don’t always know when a patient is doctor-shopping for more pills, and pharmacies can’t “second guess” questionable prescriptions.  Let’s break this down in terms of what it means for a doctor, osteopath, physician’s assistant and pharmacist trying to practice ethically and comply with federal and state laws governing furnishing of Schedule II painkillers.

1.  MD’s, DO’s and PA’s:  The Journal got it right: Doctor-shopping doesn’t always jump out at even the most discerning practitioner.  A provider-client of mine was recently threatened by a patient who said she’d report him to the Medical Board if he refused to refill her scrip.  (Naturally, he refused.)  Short of such explicit behavior, though, are you supposed to know every time?  The law enforcement agencies whose marching orders are to “crack down” on so-called overprescribers think so.  This, even though everyone knows that state-run PDMP‘s (Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs) vary widely in their effectiveness, real-time availability of data, and pharmacy participation, so a database’s usefulness to a provider can be very limited.  Faced with a clever doctor-shopper who wants to play you, on the one hand, and a hungry federal agent who almost hopes you get duped into writing the scrip, on the other, how are you to handle this swirling turbine of danger?

2.  Pharmacists:  You as a pharmacist probably have more room than you know, when it comes to ensuring that you’re filling valid prescriptions from righteous providers for legitimate medical purposes.  Many states expressly tell pharmacists that “no” is an acceptable answer to a patient seeking what the pharmacist may think is an excessive dose, or overly frequent refills, or anything else the pharmacist thinks would compromise patient safety or professional ethics.  But there is a fine line between calling out a drug-seeking patient or a dirty doctor, and going hogwild turning away business in the name of a one-person crusade against prescription painkiller abuse.

How to handle The Provider’s Dilemma without losing your patience or your patients?  The Answer:  Be in compliance with the state and federal laws governing prescribing Schedule II painkillers.  There are some clear statements of law, and more often there are the more murky (and therefore more dangerous, in this environment) “guidelines” for writing scrips.  You need to know that law, or have it explained to you.  Then you need to incorporate a compliance program within your practice:  From patient intake and screening, to informed consent and periodic review, to regular exams, to diligent record keeping, to making use of whatever PDMP database is available – these and related steps, in much more detail, ensure your good and ethical practice of medicine, provision of legitimate healthcare, and they show objectively to an investigating agency that you are practicing appropriately and your patients are in safe hands.  Comply now, and be thankful later, for anyone can come under DEA or FDA or Medical Board scrutiny at any time.  You can’t help it if you’re placed under investigation, but there is a lot you can do to help guide the outcome, keep yourself out of trouble, and stay in business.

 

Call PAINKILLER LAW: CRIMINAL LAW COMPLIANCE FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS today, at 213.293.3737, for a free consultation.  Or, write to us at info@painkillerlaw.com.  Remember:  An Apple A Day Keeps the Doctor Away, and Compliance Can Protect You From the D.E..A!

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PAINKILLER LAW: THE NEW “BLAME GAME” IN Rx ABUSE

Did you as a medical doctor, osteopath, physician’s assistant or pharmacist know that YOU are to blame for Rx abuse nationwide?  The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy is placing new emphasis on treatment and prevention of Rx abuse and urging a new, more “compassionate” model be adopted when it comes to how patients abusing prescription painkillers should be approached.  But blame for Rx abuse has to be placed somewhere.  And so it has been placed on healthcare providers who write painkiller prescriptions, and the pharmacists who fill them.

Look no further than an article in Wednesday’s Wall Street Journal for proof.  The article, “Making the Pharmacy Crawl,” explains that patients in many states have to travel to several pharmacies to fill legitimate prescriptions, as a result of new laws’ making “doctors criminally liable and revok[ing] their licenses for writing prescriptions for painkillers that lead to overdoses.”  This, in combination with pharmacies’ being subject to stricter limits on how many opioids they can dispense in a given period, has led, says the article, to a reduction in the number of doctors writing prescriptions, and in pharmacies’ not being able to fill what even a legitimate patient with a legitimate scrip might need. Is this really helping people? Or is it placing doctors’ judgment under a microscope, allowing if not requiring scrutiny of medical judgment, by government agents with no medical training or experience?  Is it substituting pharmacists’ judgment, discretion and ethics for hard and fast marching orders from the DEA?  Is it going to do anything to crack down on what the government calls the prescription painkiller epidemic, or will it just make people’s lives harder, subject them to more unwanted bureaucracy, and punish ethical practitioners and legitimate patients along with a few corrupt practitioners and drug addicts?

Ham-fisted governmental action that creates unintended consequences for good and law-abiding people abound, especially in an environment like this where the government is basically feeling its way as it goes.  When government treats a public health problem as a law enforcement problem, there is going to be a lot of collateral damage behind every press release or high profile arrest.  Don’t be the collateral damage.  Protect yourself and your practice from governmental heavyhanded behavior, by being in compliance now with all applicable criminal laws about prescribing painkillers.  Compliance goes a long way; it makes for ethical and sound patient care; it gives you peace of mind that if you’re ever investigated you will be ready; it helps persuade law enforcement that you are practicing appropriately and properly; and it acts as a foundation for a defense if you ever need.

Call Painkiller Law, a service of the Meister Law Offices, today for a free consultation on how to verify, achieve and maintain criminal law compliance in writing prescriptions for pain medication.  It’s good preventative medicine.  213.293.3737, or write us at info@painkillerlaw.com.

 

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