PAINKILLER LAW: When Crime’s All You Look For, You See Too Many Criminals

If you wake up every morning, strap on a badge and gun and go fight the War on Drugs, you come to view the world in a certain way. If your goal for each workday is to go in peace and not come back in pieces, your perspective on society, people, crime and your role in combating evil are invariably shaped by your experience. That’s why it’s a mistake for the DEA to bring its ordinary approach against drug crime to the issue of prescription drug abuse. But that is just what the agency is doing. It is basically treating like a criminal any healthcare professional who shows up on its radar.

At the recent joint conference sponsored by the California Medical Board and Board of Pharmacy, I heard the DEA speak about rampant drug diversion, pharmacists’ widespread complicity in prescription drug abuse, doctors wantonly prescribing outside the standard of care, drug dealers in white coats, and the DEA’s determination to crack down. The problem is, no one can quantify the degree of “complicity” by the nation’s pharmacists, or durably judge when a provider is prescribing outside the standard of care. The DEA says it’s happening, and its agents are the ones with the guns, and so, well, it must be happening.

The sense of things that I had coming into the conference was unfortunately not at all changed by what I heard there. The DEA’s talk was dominated by war stories of pharmaceutical distributors selling Oxy out the back door, of pharmacists ordering more than they need and keeping lousy records of where it all went, of doctors making megabucks writing scrips for no reason, and patients visiting websites devoted to the celebration of hallucinogens. Seriously, that’s what the speaker talked about. That’s clearly not the entire scope of the issue, and those characterizations don’t fairly define all medical providers or pharmacists or patients. None the less, the DEA is bringing its habitual mindset to a new class of cases and investigations – and a new “target” population – and that’s the wrong approach.

Clearly, the DEA is in reaction mode, just as Medical Boards nationwide are, and it’s being blamed for missing the early signs of what became a prescription drug abuse crisis. In reaction to the blame, the DEA is redirecting the pressure onto doctors, pharmacists and others who the DEA thinks are responsible for whatever the agency is supposed to be trying to stop. And what exactly is to be stopped? Who should decide whether a patient needs the drugs he or she is given: The prescriber, or the federal agent? If a doctor prescribes a lot of pills to a lot of patients, does it mean he or she is operating a pill mill? If a pharmacist fills prescriptions, is the pharmacist automatically part of the problem? And if the meaning of “outside the standard of care” can’t even be succinctly articulated in the law, how are law enforcement agents to know where the line is, BEFORE they decide a practitioner or pharmacist is dirty?

These are the questions all of us must vigilantly continue asking, persistently and if need be peskily, in this latest iteration of the War on Drugs. There is no easy answer, no matter what the DEA might think.

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PAINKILLER LAW: FDA and I Call For Abuse-Deterrent Drug Agents

The FDA today called upon pharmaceutical researchers to develop formulations of opioids that would bring pain relief while reducing the possibility of addiction. The FDA refers to “abuse-deterrent” drug agents in the chemical sense. I join the FDA in calling for abuse-deterrent drug agents, only the kind of agents I’m talking about wear badges, drive fast in unmarked cars, and show up heavily armed.

The FDA should be commended for its balanced approach, in which it seeks both the development of less addictive drugs, and the need to get real pain relief to patients. What concerns me is that in investigating healthcare providers who write Schedule II-V prescriptions, typically law enforcement agents including the DEA and state Medical Boards emphasize “case clearing” over balance, hard and fast over nuance, and black and white over shades of gray. Whereas the FDA’s January 9 statement expresses its extreme concern “about the inappropriate use of prescription opioids,” the FDA doesn’t define “inappropriate.” Left to the determination of the DEA, which has been accused of being late to the party on addressing prescription drug abuse, and left to state Medical Boards, which have been accused of bailing on the party altogether, the definition of “inappropriate” could be bent, twisted, contorted, and most dangerously, broadened to encompass practices and procedures which a better informed or more detached observer would never contemplate. But when the warrant is signed or the cuffs slapped on, it’s too late for a healthcare provider to say, “Let’s slow down, back up, look at this from the beginning, and then discuss.”

That is why every healthcare provider, risk manager, medical group manager and professional needs to know the black-letter federal and state law of Schedule II-V prescriptions, and the nuances and subtleties of how the law is interpreted, what influences and impacts the agencies charged with “cracking down” on supposedly corrupt providers, and what you can do now, today, to ensure patient safety and the protection of your practice. This is why PAINKILLER LAW exists. Don’t let yourself fall victim to the subjective and loosey-goosey way law enforcement agencies and Medical Boards are defining “inappropriate,” “overprescribing,” “gross negligence,” or other concepts whose interpretation could be fraught with peril for even the most honest and ethical MD, osteopath, or physician’s assistant. Let us help you verify, achieve and maintain full compliance with the laws that well-intentioned but hopelessly biased drug agents are ever more aggressively attempting to enforce.

PAINKILLER LAW – It’s good preventative medicine.

info@painkillerlaw.com 213.293.3737 MEISTER LAW OFFICES

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PAINKILLER LAW: DOCS AFRAID, SAYS LA TIMES

An important article in today’s Los Angeles Times raises important questions and doubts about the appropriateness of prosecuting healthcare providers when a patient fatally overdoses on prescription painkillers.  In Los Angeles County now, Dr. Hsiu-Ying “Lisa” Tseng has been charged with triple murder – murder! – in the overdose deaths of three patients to whom she prescribed pain medication.  I have always thought these charges are excessive, and I think it’s a dangerous precedent to start prosecuting MD’s, DO’s and PA’s for something as grave as murder.  The theory of murder is that the patient was addicted, the doctor knew it, the doctor kept writing prescriptions, the patient overdosed fatally, and the doctor was so reckless and indifferent to human life by writing the scrips that the doctor may as well have wanted or intended to kill the patient.  The theory is ridiculous, and shame on the District Attorney’s Office for leading the grieving families of the patients to believe “justice will be done” in the form of a murder conviction.  I predict the DA will fail at trial; whether a lesser theory of homicide will succeed, I don’t know.  But murder?  That’s way over the top.

Don’t let anything close to this happen to you.  Call the Meister Law Offices at 213.293.3737 for a free consultation about Painkiller Law:  Criminal Law Compliance for Healthcare Providers, or email us at info@painkillerlaw.com.

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